fDirected by Norman Taurog 
Produced by Hal B. Wallis 
Written by Edmund Beloin & Henry Garson
Music by Joseph J. Lilley 
Cinematography Loyal Griggs 
Editing by Warren Low 
Studio Hal Wallis Productions 
Distributed by Paramount Pictures 
Release date(s) August 18, 1960
Running time 104 minutes 
Country United States 
Language English 
Box office $4.3 million (USA)

SYNOPSIS:

G.I. Blues is a 1960 American musical comedy film directed by Norman Taurog and starring Elvis Presley, Juliet Prowse, and Robert Ivers. The movie was filmed at Paramount Pictures studio, with some pre-production scenery shot on location in Germany before Presley's release from the army.[3] The movie reached #2 on the Variety weekly national box office chart in 1960. The movie won a 2nd place or runner-up prize Laurel Award in the category of Top Musical of 1960.

U.S. Army Specialist 5 (SP5) Tulsa McLean (Elvis Presley) is a tank crewman with a singing career. Serving with the 3rd Armored "Spearhead" Division in West Germany, McLean dreams of running his own nightclub when he leaves the army, but such dreams don't come cheap. Tulsa and his buddies have formed a band and perform in various German "Gasthauses", night clubs, and on an Armed Forced stage. In one bar, he even discovers the record "Blue Suede Shoes" sung by someone named Elvis on a jukebox.

To raise money, Tulsa places a bet on his friend Dynamite (Edson Stroll), that he can spend the night with a club dancer named Lili (Juliet Prowse), who is rumored to be hard to get. She turned down one other G.I. operator, Turk (Jeremy Slate). Dynamite and Turk have vied for women before when the two were stationed in Hawaii. When Dynamite gets transferred to Alaska, Tulsa is brought in to take his place. He is not looking forward to it, but in order to keep his money, he must go through with it. McLean uses his Southern charm and calls Lili, "Ma'am." She at first sees Tulsa as another Occupation Duty GI. Then after a day on the Rhine, Lili begins to fall for McLean. Tulsa's friend Cookie falls in love, with Lili's roommate, Tina (Letícia Román) from Italy. In the end, Rick and Marla's baby son Tiger helps Tulsa win the bet for the outfit—and Lili's heart.


 

CAST

Elvis Presley as Spec. 5 Tulsa McLean
Juliet Prowse as Lili
Robert Ivers as PFC Cookie
James Douglas as Rick
Letícia Román as Tina
Sigrid Maier as Marla
Scotty Moore as himself
D.J. Fontana as himself
Arch Johnson as MSG McGraw
Kenneth Becker as Mac (as Ken Becker)
Carl Crow as Walt
Beach Dickerson as Warren
Trent Dolan as Mickey
Fred Essler as Papa Mueller
John Hudson as CPT Hobart
The Jordanaires as Themselves
Mickey Knox as Jeeter
Erika Peters as Trudy
Jeremy Slate as Turk
Edson Stroll as Dynamite
Ron Starr as Harvey
Ludwig Stössel as Owner, puppet show

SONGS:

What's She Really Like
Written by Sid Wayne & Abner Silver
Performed by Elvis Presley

G.I. Blues
Written by Sid Tepper & Roy C. Bennett
Performed by Elvis Presley

Doin' The Best I Can
Written by Doc Pomus & Mort Shuman
Performed by Elvis Presley

Blue Suede Shoes
Written by Carl Perkins
Performed by Elvis Presley

Frankfort Special
Written by Sid Wayne & Sherman Edwards
Performed by Elvis Presley

Shoppin' Around
Written by Sid Tepper, Roy C. Bennett & Aaron Schröder (as Aaron Schroeder)
Performed by Elvis Presley

Tonight Is So Right For Love
Written by Sid Wayne & Abner Silver
Performed by Elvis Presley

Wooden Heart
Written by Bert Kaempfert, Kay Twomey, Fred Wise & Ben Weisman
Performed by Elvis Presley

Pocketful Of Rainbows
Written by Fred Wise & Ben Weisman
Performed by Elvis Presley

Big Boots
Written by Sid Wayne & Sherman Edwards
Performed by Elvis Presley

Didja Ever
Written by Sid Wayne & Sherman Edwards
Performed by Elvis Presley

G.I. Blues is a 1960 American musical comedy film. The movie was filmed at Paramount Pictures studio, with some pre-production scenery shot on location in Germany before Presley's release from the army. The movie reached #2 on the Variety weekly national box office chart in 1960. The movie won a 2nd place or runner-up prize Laurel Award in the category of Top Musical of 1960.